Oncopeltus fasciatus

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I5klogo4.jpg Oncopeltus fasciatus

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People with a declared interest in Oncopeltus fasciatus
Abderrahman Khila Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Aleksandar Popadic Wayne State University
Ariel Chipman The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Ben Ewen-Campen Harvard University
Cassandra Extavour Harvard University
Chun-che Chang National Taiwan University
David R. Angelini American University
Ernst A. Wimmer Georg-August-University Göttingen
Friedemann Linsler IRB Barcelona
Greg Davis Bryn Mawr College
Hsiao-Ling Lu National Taiwan University
Jeremy A Lynch University of Cologne
Kristen Panfilio University of Cologne
Lena Sachs University of Cologne
Leslie Pick University of Maryland
Martin Klingler Erlangen University
Michael Schoppmeier Erlangen University
Siegfried Roth University of Cologne
Tripti Gupta Harvard University
Yen-Ta Chen University of Cologne
… further results
Nomination is supported by 25 people
Abderrahman Khila Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Ana Nast Harvard University
Ariel Chipman The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Barbora Konopova University of Cambridge
Ben Ewen-Campen Harvard University
Cassandra Extavour Harvard University
David R. Angelini American University
Ernst A. Wimmer Georg-August-University Göttingen
Evelyn Schwager Harvard University
Friedemann Linsler IRB Barcelona
Greg Davis Bryn Mawr College
Hsiao-Ling Lu National Taiwan University
Jeremy A Lynch University of Cologne
Kristen Panfilio University of Cologne
Lena Sachs University of Cologne
Leslie Pick University of Maryland
Martin Klingler Erlangen University
Michael Akam University of Cambridge
Michael Schoppmeier Erlangen University
Peter Dearden University of Otago
… further results


Transcriptome datasets for Oncopeltus fasciatus
Species Description No. sequences Last update
Oncopeltus fasciatus GenBank EST division (dbEST) 11151,115 2455686.55 May 2011

i5K Comments for Oncopeltus fasciatus
Oncopeltus was a main model organism for biochemistry and physiology for many years, and is still in use for those purposes by some groups. Lately it has become one of several new evo-devo models. It branches at the base of the holometabolous radiation and proves to be very convenient as a lab animal for embryology. RNAi and in situ are established, and a preliminary transcriptome has been published. It is also a (minor) crop pest. Ariel Chipman
Hsiao-Ling Lu


Oncopeltus fasciatus
Oncopeltus fasciatus
Large milkweed bug


Taxonomic classification
Class: Insecta
Order: Hemiptera
Family: Lygaeidae
Genus: Oncopeltus
NCBI taxid: 485px-US-NLM-NCBI-Logo.png 7536
Resources
Resource: ArthropodDB
Information
Research interest: developmental genetics, neurophysiology, metabolism, ecology
WorkingGroup: Evo-Devo, EcoGen-PopGen
Nomination: i5K initiative


I5klogo4.jpg  i5K Arthropod Sequencing Initiative
 Supported by: 25 (List of supporters)








The milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, is currently recognized as an "emerging model organism" (Liu and Kaufman, Cold Spring Harb. Protoc. 2009; doi:10.1101/pdb.emo127 [1]). It is used as a research species by a number of labs investigating topics in evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo), as well as in the fields of neurophysiology and ecological interactions focusing on plants, plant pathogens, and insecticides (Search PubMed: [2]).

Taxonomically, Oncopeltus is a member of the hemipteran suborder Heteroptera, comprising the “true bugs” ([3]), which is the same suborder as the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius prolixus (the kissing bug [4]). However, as a member of the seed bug family Lygaeidae, Oncopeltus is much easier to maintain in laboratory culture than its blood feeding relative Rhodnius, and thus offers a suitable comparative platform for research.

Within the field of evo-devo, Oncopeltus offers many advantages as a research organism. It can be easily maintained in culture and offers a continuous supply of eggs year-round (e.g., [5]). Protocols are well established for common developmental genetics techniques including in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and RNA interference (embryonic, nymphal, and parental), and the maternal and embryonic transcriptome was recently sequenced (Ewen-Campen, et al., BMC Genomics 2011. 12:61; doi:10.1186/1471-2164-12-61 [6], at NCBI [7]). Oncopeltus is one of the few hemimetabolous insects that can be readily studied, with all embryonic stages accessible for whole mount investigation. In contrast, many hemimetabolous species have particularly large, yolky eggs that limit their accessibility, have longer embryogenesis and generation times, undergo seasonal diapause, or cannot be maintained in culture.

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